Category Archives: Fairs

Artists at the Affordable Art Fair in Hampstead

There’s always a lot to see at The Affordable Art Fair; as I’d missed the Battersea one earlier this year due to pressure of deadlines I made sure I got to the Hampstead show.

Four Walls Gallery from Brighton is always worth visiting; Sam Lock’s paintings always make my heart sing.Photo by Caroline Banks Photo by Caroline Banks Photo by Caroline BanksIona House Gallery presented Claire Burke’s sophisticated and timeless pieces; I’ve featured her work here before but these more sculptural pieces were new to me. Photo by Caroline Banks Photo by Caroline Banks

Delectable bags at MADE London in Canary Wharf

I do love a good bag and these two designers seen at MADE London certainly know about making them. Although very different, each produces a “classic” style. I didn’t choose deliberately but both makers below are based in London.

Frank Horn is the name of the brand, not the person, though Francis is his middle name. He produces small runs of clean structured bags in practical sizes and a great range of plain colours –  yellow is apparently a current favourite.

Photo by Caroline Banks Photo by Caroline BanksThese covetable market/storage bags below by Maiko Dawson are some of her sturdiest ones though she has a large range of leathers and colours to choose from in other stylesPhoto by Caroline Banksfrom this acid lemon tote with pocket stitch detail

Photo by Caroline Banks

to the kid leather softness of these pocket bags and spectacle holders. Oh, and she also makes shoes.Photo by Caroline Banks

Tableware at MADE London at Canary Wharf

Lighter evenings feel like a gift of time so I profited by visiting the latest fair by MADE London held at the Winter Garden East in Canary Wharf.

We were really taken by the mid-century aesthetic of  Elizabeth Renton’s domestic ceramics in a sophisticated colour palette. One piece that stood out for me for the subtlety of colour was this crackle glazed jug. Notice how the glaze doesn’t quite reach the bottom.Photo by Caroline Banks Her mugs and small jugs fit well into the hand and are really satisfying to hold.

Photo by Caroline BanksNext on the culinary wish list was this sterling silver saucepan, just one of a range of items by Brett Payne. I made the mistake of asking how thick the silver plating was (as it would rub away with repeated cleaning) but no, his impressive front-woman (also his daughter) told us he only works in solid silver; he is a silversmith after all. Silver is  an excellent conductor of heat so just the thing for searing scallops.Photo by Caroline BanksThese swan spoons were very cute too.  Click here for the video). You need deep pockets but these pieces are investments, made to last for generations.Photo by Caroline Banks
Photo by Caroline Banks

A couple of the artists showing at Roy’s People Art Fair

My participation in the second Roy’s People Art Fair, which took place at The Bargehouse, OXO Tower in London, is the last (for a few weeks at least) of a blur of constant creative and commercial activity this year.

Photo by Caroline Banks

“The Merry Wives of Windsor” published 1910

Robert Robinson is popular on the art fair circuit exhibiting his books and cut-outs, with subjects including superheros and Alice in Wonderland. He was my neighbour at the recent The Other Art Fair but we never had the chance to talk as were so busy.Photo by Caroline Banks In complete contrast, Lucy Stevens combines sound and imagery in ongoing explorations into, as her website says, “the acoustic ecology of the natural environment”, specifically birdsong.

I didn’t have the chance to listen to her recordings but found the imagery intriguing so please visit her website to learn more.  Photo by Caroline BanksPhoto by Caroline Banks

I’m now looking forward to slowing down a little for a while.

Artists discovered at The Other Art Fair at Victoria House, London. Post 2 of 2

I never had enough time in the mornings before the fair opened to look around properly but enjoyed finding these artists, all previously unknown to me.

Ian Rayer-Smith’s lush abstracts seduced me with their colour and the energy of mark-making; they also come across as rich in meaning. I see myths and legends with the gods battling in epic skyscapes…Photo by Caroline BanksPhoto by Caroline Banksthis one evokes Leda and the swan for me but don’t let that stop you from a different  interpretation.Photo by Caroline BanksDutch artist Peter Bezuijen is also concerned with colour but in a very different way with pattern and repetition. His background in illustration and graphics is evident and I enjoy his infinite variations within quite a regimented format.   Photo by Caroline Banks Rajvi Dedhia Unadkat’s paintings combine both elements mentioned above: gestural mark-making and structural composition, seen in the layering and contrasts within a piece.Photo by Caroline Banks Photo by Caroline Banks

Artists discovered at The Other Art Fair at Victoria House, London. Post 1 of 2

It’s pretty obvious that I’m a rabid fan of The Other Art Fair, both as exhibitor and visitor with the recent event no different.

I love the exciting environment as well as the supportive community of artists and that you can see and buy fabulous art directly from the creators themselves. I really enjoy getting to know the artists and having that personal connection with the maker of whatever it is I admire or have bought. Anyway, I’ll stop eulogising and show you some photos of work I fell in love with  this time.

Just round the corner from my stand was South Korean artist Cheolyu Kim who brought everything over in one suitcase. His fantastical and unsettling compositions are rooted in his childhood close to the border with North Korea.

Photo by Caroline Banks Photo by Caroline Banks Photo by Caroline Banks Photo by Caroline Banks

Hildegard Pax ‘s dichroic glass sculptures are fresh and delicate yet powerful, influencing the space around them, Photo by Caroline Banks Photo by Caroline Banks even this small piece with paper.Photo by Caroline Banks

More to follow in my next post.

The Dark Side: some of my work to be shown at The Other Art Fair

I haven’t been out and about as much as usual as have been busy with tight deadlines so, as there’s now just a week to go till The Other Art Fair I’ve been exclusively focussed on the studio developing new work to exhibit.  Here are a few snaps of a couple of pieces that’ll be on my stand (No. 48).

Photo by Caroline Banks

Energy (dark ground) 100 x 80cm

This canvas, tentatively named Energy (dark ground), is one of a pair finished only a few days ago during the very cold spell when the pipes in my studio froze. I’m a bit obsessed with a dark ground at the moment – it has something to do with an intensity of mood. I had planned to paint a series of three ( I have a thing for triptychs) but then received my stand layout (No. 48) which doesn’t allow for 3 large pieces in a row. Never mind, they work as single paintings too.

Photo by Caroline Banks

Painting detail

Painting detail

I work ideas out through drawing and studies: this one developed from the small piece below, itself one of a series.

Photo by Caroline Banks

Dark Study (1) 18 x 13cm

One of my nightmares is naming work so please send me any suggestions – they are always welcome and I look forward to meeting you at the show.

More drawing at the London Art Fair

Drawing was what appealed to me this time around so here are some more examples I picked out (in no particular order of viewing).

Rebecca Westguard’s sensitively observed line work seen at Compass Gallery.Photo by Caroline Banks Daniel Hosego‘s original ink drawing (much smaller than I expected) on show with his prints at James Freeman GalleryPhoto by Caroline BanksOne of a couple of large sculptural drawings by Silvia Lerin shown by Joanna Bryant & Julian Page. It felt like metal, much more solid than marks made on paper.Photo by Caroline Banks Photo by Caroline Banks Hao Chen Liu fantastical scenes on paper (echoes of Hieronymus Bosch) seen at Yiri Arts Taipei Photo by Caroline BanksOne from a whole wall of drawings by Paul Feiler shown by the Redfern GalleryPhoto by Caroline Banks

And lastly these, not drawings but photographs by Sachiyo Nishimura, deceptive in the way they are presented (like fine Rotring ink drawings) by Anise Gallery. If you’re interested in art related to architecture then this is the place for you. Sachiyo Nishimura. Photo by Caroline Banks

Sachiyo Nishimura. Photo by Caroline Banks

The Drawing Works at the London Art Fair

It’s always interesting to me to look back on what has particularly caught my eye at an art event and this year’s London Art Fair was no exception. Photo by Caroline Banks

The Drawing Works presents work by artists where drawing is a central part of their practice. This time they showed a mainly abstract selection including these ink on paper pieces below by Susan Michie .Photo by Caroline BanksPhoto by Caroline BanksPhoto by Caroline BanksThe obsessive repetition of mark making has become ritualistic, inducing a feeling of contemplation in the viewer.
Photo by Caroline BanksThis Indian ink drawing by Nigel Bird was one of a couple on the stand  Photo by Caroline Banks Photo by Caroline Bankswhile this “burnt light” drawing, is one of a series by Julia Hutton.Photo by Caroline Banks

Makers seen at Made London

Artists and designers have and always will be, inspired by nature. These two makers, seen at Made London, are a case in point.

Bridget Bailey’s  exquisite interpretation of bird eggs made from textiles and feathers caught my eye, quite a change from her earlier insects and moths (see a previous post)

Bridget Bailey. Photo by Caroline BanksBridget Bailey. Photo by Caroline BanksBridget Bailey. Photo by Caroline Banks
Bridget Bailey. Photo by Caroline Banks

as did the work of another textile artist, Amanda Cobbett, who is completely obsessed with nature. Her highly reflective display boxes didn’t permit decent photos of these fungi so please visit her website for better imagery
Embroidery by Amanda Cobbett. Photo by Caroline Banks Embroidery by Amanda Cobbett. Photo by Caroline Banks Embroidery by Amanda Cobbett. Photo by Caroline Banks

And those red dots below are from my camera, not some aberration on the mushroom.

Embroidery by Amanda Cobbett. Photo by Caroline BanksTo see more of Bridget’s work, visit Clockwork Studio’s Christmas Open Studios 8th – 10th December