Category Archives: Exhibitions

Shape of Light at Tate Modern

I often enjoy going to exhibitions unprepared as that can give me a cleaner sensory experience than having read reviews; such was the case for The Shape of Light at Tate Modern.

There is something about Minimalism that resonates deeply and here are some of the pieces that stood out for me: part of  Alison Rossiter’s  expired photography paper seriesPhoto by Caroline Banks Photo by Caroline BanksBarbara Kasten’s cyanotypes Photo by Caroline Banks Photo by Caroline Banks Edward Ruscha’s parking lot photos next to Carl Andre’s Steel Zinc PlainPhoto by Caroline Banks

Black by Inge Dick  (the people and shapes are all reflections)Photo by Caroline BanksOne of Jay Defeo’s Untitled pieces Photo by Caroline BanksJohn Hilliard’s Seven Representations of White (with more reflections)Photo by Caroline Banksand, seen at the end, Thomas Ruff’s massively scaled virtual photogramsPhoto by Caroline Banks Photo by Caroline Banks

 

Tacita Dean – Landscape at the Royal Academy

The inaugural exhibition in the new Gabrielle Jungels-Winkler Galleries at the Royal Academy is LANDSCAPE, one of the three concurrent London exhibitions by Tacita Dean. I wasn’t quite sure what to expect but was really impressed by the scale and sensitivity of the work shown. Zooming in and out is an essential part of the experience (I use those terms deliberately).

Here’s a view through to The Montafon Letter, a huge chalk drawing on blackboard of a mountain (there’s a bit more to it than just that).  Photo by Caroline BanksMajesty, one of a series of works on paper from 2016Photo by Caroline Banks

Cloud drawings, also from 2016,  in front of her collection of round stones.Photo by Caroline BanksI really liked the contrast of jade reflected in the glass frame of this massive print Quarantania.Photo by Caroline BanksHer film Antigone is also on show – I wasn’t able to see all of it so will complete the experience on my next visit.

Raw Materials at the Nunnery Gallery, Bow Arts.

East London has a rich and varied textile history for manufacturing and  innovation which this exhibition, at The Nunnery Gallery, Bow Arts,  examines.

Photo by Caroline BanksThe invention of the first synthetic dye, mauveine, by William Perkin took place at his family home in Shadwell  and brought the colour purple to the masses Photo by Caroline Banksand wood block printing by R.E. Littler for Liberty of London took place in the Lea Valley.Photo by Caroline BanksContemporary creativity still abounds in the East End with current work by artists and designers including London College of Fashion student Isabella Dunne’s “Raw Pressed” digital printPhoto by Caroline Banksand Sarah Desmarais’ fashion prints as well as Photo by Caroline Banks Photo by Caroline Banks Freya Gabie’s Chatham rope and spun golden thread piece  90,000 miles across the sunPhoto by Caroline BanksPhoto by Caroline Banks

Back to the history, I just had to include the compact spinning wheel Mahatma Gandhi brought for his 3 month trip to England in 1931 during which time he was based in Bromley by Bow. 
Photo by Caroline Banks

Artist Jake Wood-Evans seen at Unit Gallery

I can’t explain the appeal of paint – it just gets me and I stand there gawping, jaw agape, occasionally uttering “ooohh” before remembering where I am (usually a public place).

Paintings by Jake Wood-Evans have been known to have that effect on me. His show at Unit Gallery was filled with lush classically-inspired oil paintings.
Transitions by Jake Wood-Evans. Photo by Caroline Banks

Yes, I get the grand master classical references, but for me the magic is in his application of paintTransitions by Jake Wood-Evans. Photo by Caroline Banks Transitions by Jake Wood-Evans. Photo by Caroline Banks Transitions by Jake Wood-Evans. Photo by Caroline BanksThe light, spaces and bare areas and their interrelationship. Transitions by Jake Wood-Evans. Photo by Caroline Banks Transitions by Jake Wood-Evans. Photo by Caroline Banks The whole point of course, is that this can’t be expressed in words. If it could there would be no need to paint.Transitions by Jake Wood-Evans. Photo by Caroline Banks Transitions by Jake Wood-Evans. Photo by Caroline Banks Transitions by Jake Wood-Evans. Photo by Caroline Banks

Rachel Whiteread at Tate Britain

I’ve long been an admirer of Rachel Whiteread’s work which can be seen at Tate Britain for another couple of weeks. Best known for her large scale sculpture projects, one of my favourites includes this one, Untitled (One Hundred Spaces) 1995, laid out in the Duveen Galleries

Rachel Whiteread. Photo by Caroline BanksI almost expect to see the elements vibrate with the memories of the space they contain. Rachel Whiteread. Photo by Caroline BanksMost exhibits are displayed in one large room with no internal divisions; I enjoyed walking from one area to the next and turning back to see the room from different angles  Rachel Whiteread. Photo by Caroline BanksDue Porte, featured on the catalogue cover, looks quite different from the side.Rachel Whiteread. Photo by Caroline BanksI hadn’t seen these studies and domestically scaled sculptures before, which resonated for me  in a different way. Rachel Whiteread. Photo by Caroline Banks Rachel Whiteread. Photo by Caroline BanksRachel Whiteread. Photo by Caroline BanksRachel Whiteread. Photo by Caroline Banks Rachel Whiteread. Photo by Caroline BanksHer work strikes me with its humanity regarding memory.

Natural Selection exhibition by Artangel

Artist Andy Holden and his father Peter Holden share a fascination with birds. Peter is a bird  expert, running the RSPB’s Young Ornithologists’ Club amongst other activities.

Father and son worked on Natural Selection, an exhibition staged by Artangel which was a combination of education and art. There was much more to it than this one room but I wanted to share the seductive beauty of the eggs, so realistic yet all painstakingly made of porcelain and painted by hand.

Porcelain eggs. Photo by Caroline Banks Porcelain eggs. Photo by Caroline Banks Porcelain eggs. Photo by Caroline Banks Porcelain eggs. Photo by Caroline Banks

Olafur Eliasson room at the Monochrome exhibition, National Gallery

Olafur Eliasson shows us in the last part of Monochrome, Painting in Black & White at the National Gallery, that monochrome doesn’t automatically mean only black & white.

After a fascinating exhibition of more traditional interpretations, including some staggeringly convincing trompe l’oeil painting, you walk into a bright yellow room and everything becomes tones of that colour.

Photo by Caroline Banks Photo by Caroline BanksThe ceiling is lined with sodium yellow monofrequency lamps, a colour that suppresses all others.
Photo by Caroline Banksand even my pillar box red jacket cannot resist the influence of the shadow-free light.Photo by Caroline Banks

Everything at Once exhibition at 180 Strand , London

The Lisson Gallery & The Vinyl Factory held Everything at Once at Store Studios recently to mark its anniversary with this exhibition. Of the 24 artists included I’ll mention 2: Richard Long with Pelopennese Line, a temporary mural made directly on the wall.Pelopennese Line by Richard Long. Photo by Caroline BanksPelopennese Line by Richard Long. Photo by Caroline BanksAl Arabia Al Madfuna III by Wael Shawky had me transfixed; here are a few stills from the film where the production in negative created a mythical and dreamlike atmosphere whilst  the text dealt with history, estrangement and, at times, horror.Still from Al Araba Al Madfuna III by Wael Shawky Photo by Caroline Banks Still from Al Araba Al Madfuna III by Wael Shawky Photo by Caroline BanksStill from Al Araba Al Madfuna III by Wael Shawky Photo by Caroline Banks Still from Al Araba Al Madfuna III by Wael Shawky Photo by Caroline Banks

White Noise at The Crypt, London

The Crypt Gallery is to be found below the huge church on Euston Road and is an atmospheric warren of spaces to explore.

White Noise, an artists’ collective, showed there recently including Annamarie Dzendrowskyj  whose oil paintings evoke a sense of mystery and uncertainty Hanna ten Doornkaat has been featured in my posts before – her scribbled, scratched and scraped pieces telling of unknown histories This large canvas by Sandra Beccarelli  intrigued me with its systematic arrangement of marks both on and in the canvas.

Young Masters at The Royal Overseas League in London

London Clubland (not the dancing type) is a world that most of us are only vaguely aware of and the Royal Overseas League is a case in point. A magnificent building tucked in a courtyard in St James and overlooking Green Park, it really is hidden away in the centre of London.

I’d heard about it but never actually been till very recently when invited to attend the Young Masters Art Prize exhibition, held there for the first time.

Organised by the Cynthia Corbett Gallery, the Young Masters celebrates artists “who pay homage to  the  skill and techniques of the past; knowing that young artists today are not afraid, unlike their predecessors, to look back at art history and its lessons.” Painting, photography, video and ceramics were all included.

This skylight and the next couple of photos give a small indication of the interior as well as how well the artwork sits within it.

Work by Antoine Schneck and Christoph Steinmeyer below.Isabelle van Zeijl‘s photography is on the left.These 3 photos by Sandro Miller (apologies for the photo quality but it was pretty dark) had me perplexed for a while but I got it by the third one. Can you?Lauren Nauman’s frail porcelain and brass piece below was only one of several ceramic artists shown.  ROSL, as it is commonly known, was the first London club to accept female members from the beginning and has an ongoing programme of art and music. For more information please visit the website.